Cold and flu, the romance killer

Cold and flu, the romance killer

You’re in a lift, someone sneezes, you hold your breath and hope your floor is near. You burst out of the door and take a deep breath because catching a cold is the last thing you have time for.

The word, avoidable, when talking about colds and flu, stares you in the face every time you are close to someone with colds and flu. You could wash your hands frequently, cover your mouth and walk wide berths around sneezy, coughy people but what would you do if your loved one has a cold?

In a recent poll conducted by researchers Ovatoyou, it was found when asked questions about romance vs colds and flu, that 64% of respondents would not kiss someone who is coughing or had a runny nose. Dating was out for 17%, holding hands a no-no for 19% and asking someone on a romantic date would be a challenge for 22%.

It was clear that avoiding physical contact with individuals that displayed cold and flu symptoms, was top of mind when considering how close to get romantically. When considering social behaviour, self-confidence was affected as less people were willing to initiate a date when displaying cold and flu symptoms.

Women have a far greater instant opinion on this matter than do men as an 80:20 split was evident in the poll.

Some respondents indicated that they would feel incredibly uncomfortable on a romantic date if their partner coughed and spluttered through the date.  It seems that true love can conquer all according to one of the respondents, she loved her boyfriend so much she would not mind catching a cold or the flu just to be with him.

So if your date has a cold or you are feeling like you are getting a cold, dissolve a tablet of Airmune in water, drink daily and add one more line of defence against the germy winter season.

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