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According to the 2018 Global Asthma Report, asthma is the most common chronic illness in South African children and has shown an increasing prevalence in both urban and rural areas1. Second-hand smoke exposure and living in highly populated areas can exacerbate asthma in young children3

Studies have also shown that many children with asthma are using their inhalers incorrectly1 and some children may even be embarrassed to use their inhalers in front of their friends, resulting in poor asthma control4. Therefore, parents need all the help they can get, especially when it comes to helping their children improve their inhaler technique. CEO of Cipla South Africa, Paul Miller said: “Children specifically tend to struggle with the steps involved in using an inhaler correctly, and often feel self-conscious using it. That’s why Cipla is launching the Bronki Boosters campaign to educate children and help minimise the stigma associated with asthma and using inhalers.”

The Bronki Boosters campaign is arming children with superpowers to beat Skyron and his constrictors who have come to attack their world and steal all their air. And which child doesn’t want to be a superhero?

In a series of videos, comic books and a game, superheroes from a faraway planet, Iggy and Wisp, come to help young asthmatics fight the evil constrictors, by teaching them how to use their inhalers correctly and unleash their superpowers.

“For 60 years, Cipla has consistently strived to bring world-class quality medication, enhancing the field of respiratory illness both in products and education across the world,” said Miller. With the COVID-19 pandemic, respiratory ailments have come even more into the spotlight spurring Cipla on in their mission to help millions breathe freely.

References:

  1. The Global Asthma report 2018. Management of Asthma and Capacity Building. Available at: http://www.globalasthmareport.org/management/southafrica.php. (Accessed: 26 August 2020).
  2. The South African Medical Journal. The increasing burden of Asthma in South African children: A call to action. Available at: http://www.samj.org.za/index.php/samj/article/view/12337. (Accessed: 26 August 2020).
  3. Information paper for health professionals. Inhaler technique for people with asthma or COPD. Available at: https://extranet.who.int/ncdccs/Data/AUS_D1_Inhaler_Technique_Infopaper-FULL-UPDATED-11-1.pdf. (Accessed: 28 September 2020).  
  4. De Simoni, Anna, et al. “What do adolescents with asthma really think about adherence to inhalers? Insights from a qualitative analysis of a UK online forum.” BMJ open 7.6 (2017).